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Saturday, July 27, 2013

Double The Fun Giveaway Day #2!

Welcome to Day #2 of our giveaway!  We are so thrilled with the excitement around it, and we hope that you are all excited, too.  If you haven't already signed up for the 2 $50 TpT Gift Certificates, go back to THIS post and enter to win!  Then, come back here for a chance to win today's product giveaway.

CONGRATS to Margarat and Cammie for winning yesterday's giveaway.  Your prizes should be in your inbox already!

If you teach multiplication, check out the comments in yesterday's post.  There are a lot of great multiplication tips!


Today, I'm giving away two of my popular products.  Two winners will win BOTH products!  The first one is my Cause & Effect Activity Bundle, and the second is my Main Idea Task Cards set.  (They are both differentiated, and they are both classroom tested.)


Don't forget to stop by The Science Penguin to see what awesome products she is giving away today!



a Rafflecopter giveaway

Stop by tomorrow for more giveaways, and more fun surprises as the week goes on! Follow my blog with Bloglovin

44 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. When I introduce cause and effect I always start by walking with my shoes untied and pretend to fall. We talk about what happened and why it happened!

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  2. I love using the commercial for Liberty Mutual for teaching cause and effect. It's available on Youtube. It's the one where a good deed follows a good deed follows a good deed...

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  3. I love using the book Fortunately, Unfortunately when introducing cause and effect.

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  4. My favorite cause and effect activity is making a web with the cause or effect in the middle. Students web their ideas for effects for the cause or causes for the effects.

    Aimee
    aimee@vanmiddlesworth.org
    Pencils, Books, and Dirty Looks

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  5. I like to use The Quarreling Book. dbednarsk@yahoo.com

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  6. I like to use the "If You Give A ..." books by Laura Numeroff.

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  7. When I teach cause and effect, I compare it to a chain reaction with an accident on the freeway. They seem to really understand how one thing can cause many other things to happen. I also like to use the book Fortunately, Unfortunately.

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  8. I like using the 4 pictures 1 word for Main Idea. Each picture can mean one thing when separated but when they are put all together the all tie into on Main topic or Idea. It is also a great tool to use when developing vocabulary.

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  9. Cause and effect can be a toughie! Looking forward to using these sets this year.

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  10. I teach cause and effect at time within science - what effect happens when we change something.

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  11. I use graphic organizers to teach both.

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  13. I like to teach cause and effect with the book "Cloudy with a chance of meatballs". So fun for the kids.

    gatta@unbc.ca

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  14. We use a muti-flow Thinking Map to map out cause and effect. I like to begin with picture books before tackling novel chapters. :o)

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  15. I like to read "Bad Case of Stripes"

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  16. I like to use Role Play for Cause and Effect. I have a stack of cards with scenarios on them and the students have to act them out.

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  17. I like to use graphic organizers and picture books to teach cause and effect.
    Bethany
    FabandFunin4th!

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  18. I like to use real-life scenarios to teach cause and effect.

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  19. I like to use classroom rules at the beginning of the year to teach cause and effect.

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  20. I, too, like to use picture books to introduce cause and effect and have used dominoes to illustrate the "chain reaction" effect of this concept. :) One thing that I do is to use the game Mouse Trap, setting it up and having the students observe and record the series of causes and effects on a graphic organizer. Here is a description of what happens at the end of this game as the "trap" is sprung:

    "In a proper operation, the player turns the crank, which rotates a vertical gear, connected to a horizontal gear. As that gear turns, it pushes an elastic-loaded lever until it snaps back in place, hitting a swinging boot. This causes the boot to kick over a bucket, sending a marble down a zig-zagging incline (the "rickety stairs") which feeds into a chute. This leads the marble to hit a vertical pole, at the top of which is an open hand, palm-up, which is supporting a larger ball (changed later on to a marble just like the starter one). The movement of the pole knocks the ball free to fall through a hole in its platform into a bathtub, and then through a hole in the tub onto one end of a seesaw. This launches a diver on the other end into a tub which is on the same base as the barbed pole supporting the mouse cage. The movement of the tub shakes the cage free from the top of the pole and allows it to fall."

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  21. For main idea, I like to have students look to see which word/phrase is repeated most in the text - that's the topic. Then think, what is the author saying about the topic? That's the main idea. Then we can go into the text to find details to support it.

    Students are very familiar with cause and effect by 4th grade so it's easy to review by giving students an action (didn't bring in homework) and asking them to come up with a cause (why?) or an effect (what happens?). Making it real life definitely helps too!

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  22. More than you want to know about Mouse Trap, I am sure, but found these videos that would work as well...or better than the actual game even AND much cheaper and time-consuming! :) Here are the links:
    http://www.youtube.com/watchv=ns5Nmzrw3Ow
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pk1ue1tolFc
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GFNTplHbYc This one is longer..actual chain reaction starts about 3:55. Kind of cute, though, as it starts with him singing the commercial ditty and at the end, he asks "What is your favorite board game?". Could work into a writing lesson? :)

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  23. Teaching main idea is a core skills in the language curriculum. I find that teaching students about the GIST of the story helps them find the main idea. It is the core or heart of the piece they have read, the takeaway.
    Sidney

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  24. I use graphic organizers to teach cause and effect. I also teach the language of cause and effect, like therefore, as a result, so.

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  25. To teach cause and effect, I do the physical! SHOWING the cause and effect is beneficial to students, as it's hands on and interactive, giving them a better way to remember! :)

    Sara
    Miss V's Busy Bees
    ventrellasara@gmail.com

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  26. I like to use If you give a Mouse a Cookie to teach cause and effect. Then I have my students create their own story and share then with a partner, Their partner will fill out a graphic organizer on their partner's story

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  27. I like using pictures to get my students started thinking about cause and effect. It is also really helpful in main idea because it helps them weed out all the details and "see" what the reason behind the picture is!
    Courtney
    Polka Dot Lesson Plans

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  28. I love to use Fortunately by Remy Charlip. In addition to the examples of cause and effect it invites readers to find, it screams for students to use it as a mentor text for writing.

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  29. For cause and effect, I like to use if you give a mouse a cookie and the student create cause and effect puzzles.

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  30. I like to read Happy Birthday, Dr. King! to teach cause and effect. The kids can make connections with the main character in the story.

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  31. I like to make cause and effect T-charts with my students. They make it easy to see if you have the "what happened" and "why did it happen" correct.

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  32. When introducing cause and effect I bring in comics without words. We talk about what is happening in one frame only. Then what will be the effect of what is happening and what the next frame be.

    kim.combs@pfisd.net

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  33. We do a lot scenarios in class to begin cause and effect

    Kristi
    disneymum.wordpress.com

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  34. I love to have my students role play cause and effect situations. We draw topics out of a bag and then they come up with the skit to demonstrate. It is too, too funny but they get it!

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  35. I like to use If you give a Mouse a Cookie for cause and effect.

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  36. These would be great for literacy centers!

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  37. When teaching Main Idea I always the the 3 question rule. Who/What was it about? What did they do? and Why was it important? If they can answer those questions, they've got it!

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  38. When I was a reading teacher, I would narrow down our reading to "Who or what?" and the kids would answer, then I'd ask "What did they do? or What about it?" It may seem a bit old-fashioned but I found if I taught the kids to do this periodically throughout their reading, it helped them to focus on main idea.

    Love this giveaway!
    karen
    The 85 Mile Commute

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  39. I love using introducing or reviewing either of the topics and then using magazine or newspaper articles with pictures or cartoons in order to have them wonder about what the main idea could be or to figure out the cause and effect of a picture. The kiddos really do enjoy looking like mini adults scanning through a newspaper.
    be well,
    ivett

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  40. We set up different fun scenarios, and I have a couple picture books I use such as "If you give a...". We have fun with teaching cause and effect.

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  41. I use the "if you give" series by Laura Numeroff to teach cause and effect.

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