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Sunday, March 1, 2015

A Quick and Easy {Differentiated} Review Activity

This will be a quick blog post, but it's something you can use in like... 5 minutes if you need to!  Last year toward the end of the year, when I was reviewing a standard strand with my students before a test, they were getting pretty sick of the content.  We had done a lot of work with it (inequalities) because it is an intense concept for little people, but I needed to know who still needed more work and in which areas.  I grabbed some of Lindsay Perro's review activities, printed one copy of each standard review, and hung them in the hall.  (Lindsay only creates for middle school, but you can find these types of assessments ALL over TpT with one page reviews for each standard strand.  If you don't want to do that, you could do it with any worksheet or set of task cards you have.  If you want to adapt it for task cards, print them and don't cut them out into four separate cards.  Just hang the 8.5x11 sheets on the wall and it will serve the same purpose!)

You can also use this to review on concept with different task cards or worksheets.  I just happened to be reviewing an entire standard when we did the activity.

Here is how it worked...  Students had both a colored pen and a pencil.  They went to each sheet and completed a problem in pencil, careful to show their work.  They wrote their initials next to their work.  Another student then came and checked their work using a colored pen.  If they agreed with their work and their answer, they put a big check mark and their initials.  If they disagreed, they showed their work and their answer in the same box, then added their initials.

Here is a page that has been mostly completed and is waiting to be checked by other students. 

I put the sheets out in the hallway so that we had a lot of room to work.  Two kids could work on one page at the same time.
Each student needed to do one of each type of problem.  There were eight problems on each page, so with each person completing one problem and then checking one problem, there was enough for 16 people per page.  If you have more than 16 students (which you likely do), you will need to divide your students and classroom in half and have two separate areas completing the activity OR you can differentiate it and have some students working on one concept and others working on a different concept or level of the concept.

Here is an example of a completed sheet.
My students were SO much more engaged than if I had made them sit down and complete each of these worksheets individually, they still got the review they needed, and I was able to see where students were still struggling.


  1. Love this idea, Mary! I have a bunch of task cards on key chains. We have tables in our classroom, so I think I'll spread them around on the tables with a recording sheet and do a similar type of activity. Thanks for the great idea!